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Colonial Roofing & Siding
 
Our Best Reference is Your Neighbor
 
Free Estimate | Call Us Today
 
325 South Wall St, Kingston NY 12401
 
 
 
 
 
 

Frequently Asked Questions

 
 
Q
 
Why should I choose Colonial Roofing?
 
 
A
 
For over 60 years, Colonial Roofing & Siding Company has dedicated our services to thousands of local satisfied customers. Our employees are fully protected with Worker's Compensation Insurance and we are always up to date on General Liability Insurance. Each job is monitored by a foreman and your sales person, ensuring quality control and accuracy from sale to job completion. We strive for customer satisfaction and always view the customer as an important asset to our livelihood. We fully recognize that your support has made us the company we are today. We worry about the details, so you don't have to. Superior service equals peace of mind!
 

 
Q
 
How do I get an estimate?
 
 
A
 
Simply call our office at (845) 331-2049 or email us at croofing1953@aol.com. You can also click on "Get a Free Estimate" on our home page. An estimator will then contact you to schedule your free estimate as soon as possible.
 

 
Q
 
Are you insured and what does that mean?
 
 
A
 
Colonial Roofing and Siding is fully insured. We have full Worker's Compensation insurance, which covers ALL of our employees in case of any accidents or injuries. In addition, we carry full General Liability insurance , covering both the homeowner and the homeowner's property. All company vehicles are properly identified and insured. Proper insurance enables our customers the ability to have total confidence in Colonial Roofing and complete peace of mind throughout the entire job.
 

 
Q
 
How do I pay?
 
 
A
 
We accept cash, check, and or credit card. Colonial Roofing usually asks for a ten percent deposit at the signing of our contracts. Upon completion of the job, payment is due, as long as the customer is completely satisfied.
 

 
Q
 
What shingles do you carry?
 
 
A
 
Our brand of choice is Owens Corning. Please keep in mind we have access to all brands of shingles. We can install any shingle should you be more comfortable with another shingle brand. Just let us know during the estimate and we will be happy to meet your needs.
 

 
Q
 
What is an ice dam & why does it happen?
 
 
A
 
WHAT IS AN ICE DAM? An ice dam is a ridge of ice that builds up along the edge of a roof. The ice creates a dam that backs water up and under the roof shingles. Once the water is deep enough, it penetrates the roofing system and creates water damage inside the home.To recognize an ice dam, look for a bulge of ice attached to the eaves or overhang of a roof. There may be icicles (“Aren't they pretty!”) hanging from the edge, and you may see stains on the siding. The rain gutters may be overflowing with ice. Often, the bulge of ice is covered with several inches of snow, so you may not see it. Under the buildup of frozen snow is the melting snow and ice—water that is entering your home. If interior damage has already occurred, you will see a wet ceiling and wall or water flowing into windows.

RELATED DAMAGE Beneath the ice dam, undetectable damage is occurring in the attic and wall cavities. The wood framing is wet and may be rotting. Insulation is soaked, which makes it inefficient. Mildew and mold can grow in hidden spots, causing odors and other problems inside your home. Soaked framing and insulation will take a long time to dry out and will continue to contribute to wall damage and interior moisture problems. Uncorrected, the water can cause serious structural damage.

UNDER COVER: A CLOSE LOOK AT THE CAUSE Ice dam problems are most common in snowbelt regions. They begin when snow accumulates on a roof. Generally, deeper snow and colder temperatures increase the formation of ice dams. North or northwest winds usually accompany snowfalls, so more snow is deposited on north and west roof planes. Complex roof structures that trap snow compound its depth and the problems it creates. Once the snow has built up on the roof, it acts as an effective insulator. (Light snow has an insulation value of about R-1 per inch.) Heat from the attic warms the underside of the roof and melts the bottom snow into a slush/ice/water mixture. This mixture slides under the snow cover and runs down the roof till it meets a cold surface like the overhang. The slush then refreezes. As more slush accumulates, the layer becomes thicker and thicker, creating an ice dam. All of this action occurs hidden from view under the snow cover. Once the ice dam is high enough to overcome the pitch of the roof, water seeps under asphalt shingles. Standard roof shingle construction is not designed to resist the attack of water pooling on its surface. The alternate freezing and thawing that occurs under these conditions can increase the magnitude of roof leaks. Once the water has penetrated the shingles, it flows under the siding and eaves and leaks through the framing into your home.

“IT NEVER HAPPENED IN THE GOOD OLD DAYS” What seasoned homeowners say is true: ice dams were not a problem before the ‘30s or ‘40s. Back then, builders used a totally different type of construction. Homes had steeply pitched roofs. Wooden shingles were installed over spaced boards for sheathing so the shingles could breathe and dry. Spaces between the shingles and deck ventilated the attic and cooled the roof deck. Many families did not fully heat the home's second story, or they heated it just enough to keep water from freezing in a drinking glass. (I grew up in one of those homes.) In newer homes with good heating systems, the attic was often excessively warm because energy was cheap and so homes were not well insulated. This excessive heat rapidly melted the snow on the roof. Usually a small line of ice existed only at the gutter or eaves, and even that cleared on warmer days. Water penetration did not linger, and ice dams as we know them today did not exist. Then, in the 1930s and ‘40s, we began to tighten up our homes and use new materials. Roofers began applying asphalt shingles, and building paper, plywood, insulation, and vapor barriers came into use. Central heating was made very effective, and all the living spaces were heated. These changes triggered new problems with moisture and ice dams. Attic ventilation slowly became the standard.

Tom Feiza's Tips For Operating Your Home
 

 
Q
 
Algae growth on shingles?
 
 
A
 
Description:
Algae growth causes a dark discoloration on roofs. The algae is usually brown to black in color which results in a streaked, dirty looking rooftop. Algae may be mistaken for soot, dirt, or tree droppings, which typically produce only localized discoloration. The primary species of algae being observed is Gloeocapsa. This type of algae is contained in and transported through the air, and tends to collect and grow upon roofing structures. This type of roof discoloration has been most widespread in the Gulf States and along the Northwest and Eastern Seaboards. It is not, however, confined to only these regions. Algae growth occurs to varying degrees in all regions of the country, especially those subjected to warm, humid conditions.

Recommended Cleaning Methods:
Discoloration of roofs caused by fungus or algae is difficult to remove, but may be lightened by spraying a diluted solution of chlorine bleach, trisodium phosphate, and water onto the roof. Solutions range from one cup TSP, one gallon bleach and four gallons of water, to one cup TSP and 2.5 gallons each of bleach and water. This solution can then be rinsed from the roof in 10 to 15 minutes. Do not scrub; scrubbing will loosen and remove granules. After spraying be sure to thoroughly flush the roof and the greenery around the home (grass, bushes and shrubs) with water. The effectiveness of this type of cleaning may only be temporary and the discoloration may recur. High pressure washing is not recommended due to the possibility of removing granules, thereby shortening the life of the roofing system.

How Does Algae Affect the Performance of Asphalt Shingles?
Owens Corning Roofing feels that algae deposits or fungus growth will not affect the service life of the shingle. Because a white or light colored roof is turned dark brown or black it will absorb more heat or energy, therefore accelerating the aging process possibly causing premature granule loss. It is important to note that this is only our opinion and that we have not performed any testing to provide the technical justification regarding the impact on the performance of asphalt shingles due to fungus or additional heat build-up.

Algae Resistant Shingles:
The most effective solution available for preventing algae or fungus growth are asphalt shingle products
that incorporates metals like copper or zinc in the granules. The algicidal properties of these metals were discovered by observing that algae stains were rarely seen in the areas beneath metal vents or flashing, even when the rest of a roof was infested. The algae-inhibiting effects come from a gradual dissolution or leaching of metal under normal weathering conditions. Owens Corning Roofing and Asphalt, LLC offers a complete line of Algae Resistant Shingles.